Five Things to Sew This Weekend: Travel Edition

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

We’re still traveling and visiting family until Monday, so no sewing is happening here, but I have been gathering inspo all the same! Here are five things you can sew up this weekend, and this time they’re all travel related. Enjoy!

Five travel-related sewing tutorials you can sew up this weekend. || PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

Packing cubes! Yes! I so wish I had some of these. Sometimes my husband and I share a giant suitcase and I feel like it gets so jumbled up. I almost went out and bought some the day before our trip, but I didn’t. Now I can just make some!

Triangle Zipper Pouches. This is a video tutorial on my YouTube channel and I use these pouches to contain hair accessories during trips. Super useful! These are my favorite zippers for this project (and many other projects, for that matter!)

Cord Keepers. Very useful and easy to personalize. These would make great stocking stuffers at Christmastime. I think I’d use my snap pliers and snaps to make them even easier.

Travel Wrap. This is brilliant. If you’ve ever been cold on a flight, you know how miserable that is. This knit wrap can be worn as a scarf, shawl, nursing cover, cardigan, or blanket. Pretty ingenious, if you ask me! She doesn’t link to any specific fabrics, but I think rayon jersey like this or this would be my first choice for this wrap.

Sleep mask. I have a template you can download for free. Obviously, you can leave off the emojis, if you want. I also just remembered, I have a cute pig neck pillow tutorial in the archives also! Find that here.

Ok, that was technically six things, not five, so I’ll go ahead and add another. I wanted to bring a sock money to a little friend we were going to be seeing while in Colorado, so I brought that along as a hand sewing project (see, it IS travel-related ;)

I have a full video sock monkey tutorial on my YouTube channel. I went ahead and machine sewed the monkey body parts before we left home, then brought them along and stuffed and hand sewed him while on our trip. Our little friend really loves his sock monkey, which does my heart good :)

That’s all for now! Happy Sewing! I’m living vicariously through you all, haha! Can’t wait to get back to my machines next week :)

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How to Sew A Pencil-Shaped Pencil Pouch

I have such a fun video tutorial to share with you! I like to call this a "literal pencil pouch”, haha. You can learn to sew a pencil-shaped pencil pouch with this beginner friendly tutorial. It’s fun to get creative with the fabrics and stitches. Not all pencils are yellow, after all, so think outside the box with your fabrics!

You can watch the video below and if you need to save this post for later, just pin this next photo to Pinterest and be sure and share with your friends! Under the video, you’ll find some links to the supplies that you’ll need, or that would be helpful for this project.

This post my contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links.  For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Free pattern and video tutorial

Here’s your tutorial! I try to make these videos as beginner friendly as I can. If you have ideas for other back-to-school sewing projects, let me know in the comments! And be sure and check out my back-to-school sewing ideas here. Enjoy!

Other than some cute fabrics, you’ll need a good zipper for this project. I love these zippers best and always keep a stash of them in my sewing room. And for interfacing, this kind is what I almost always use. And as always, Wonder Clips are always handy, along with a rotary cutter and mat.

And of course, you’ll also need the pattern! Complete the form below to receive the free printable pattern in your inbox.

As always, if you use this tutorial, I'd love to see! Find me on Instagram and share your creation with me! Feel free to tag me on Instagram @pincutsew

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How to sew a cover for any size Bible or book

This post my contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links.  For more info, see my disclosure policy.

It's been awhile since I've made a YouTube video, so I'm so excited to share a new one with you today! Natalie got a new Bible recently and wanted a cover for it with handles. This ain't your Grandma's bible cover, I promise, it's simple and modern! I based this off of the one I'd made for my own Bible years ago out of some Kazakh embroidery my mom had given me from Mongolia. 

Here's the tutorial! I'd love it if you'd subscribe and share! I feel so honored to have almost 5,000 subscribers, YouTube is pretty fun. Below the video, I'll link up to the products I mentioned. Enjoy!

Here is the exact Bible we are covering.

Here are the magnetic snaps. I keep these on hand in my sewing room, they’ve been useful for many things.

Here is the rotary cutter and mat.

And here are those Wonder Clips.

Holler at me if you enjoyed this video and if you made a Bible or book cover, I’d love to see! Just tag me on Instagram @pincutsew.

Cheers!

Bible or book cover video tutorial by Nikki Schreiner
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How to read a sewing pattern part 2: Making sense of sizing

This post contains affiliate links, which mean that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links.  For more info, see my disclosure policy. 

If you haven't read part 1 of this series, be sure to go back and start there!

Just this morning on one of the large sewing Facebook groups I'm a part of, a newer seamstress was venting about her lack of success with using patterns lately because of the ill fit. She just couldn't seem to make sense of the sizing! 

How to read a sewing pattern by www.pincutsewstudio.com

While we may be quick to blame the pattern industry, the fault really lies partly with the ready-to-wear fashion industry and what we call "vanity sizing". In this article for Time, Eliana Dockterman puts it simply: "As Americans have grown physically larger, brands have shifted their metrics to make shoppers feel skinnier—so much so that a women’s size 12 in 1958 is now a size 6." (That article is truly fascinating if you get a chance to read it!) Here is another great read about this issue as it pertains to sewing.

Vanity Sizing. Source: https://www.someecards.com/usercards/viewcard/MjAxMy00OGNmYjhjZWM4MjU1NWQ1/

While sizing labels on clothing at the store have gotten gradually smaller over the course of several decades, the sizing on sewing patterns have stayed relatively the same and this is why the first thing I tell people when helping them sew with a pattern for the first time is not to read too much into the number of the size they are on the chart! We ladies can be quite sensitive about this, no? 

So, let's go back to that handy size chart on the back of the pattern envelope. Once again I'm using my kids shorts pattern for reference. This being a kids pattern with an elastic waistband, we won't have a hard time fitting. For this pattern, making it with six different girls, I simply used their waist and hip measurements. If these measurements put them in two different sizes, I always go with the larger one. Kids are obviously less curvy than adults, so the size chart on children's pattern tend to be pretty reliable. I had one student who had to take in the side seams because her shorts were too big, but this was no problem. If they'd been too small, that would have been much harder! 

Pro Tip: It's easier to take in than to take out! So if you have to choose, going up a size makes more sense than going down a size. Even on complicated patterns, I've been able to add darts, gathers, larger seams or other creative solutions to solve too-big issues. Too-small issues, on the other hand, have fewer options for fixing. 

How to read a sewing pattern: sizing, by www.pincutsewstudio.com

Now, here's where things get really interesting. Like the new seamstress on the Facebook rant this morning, you may find that that handy sizing chart isn't always super accurate. What if it told you to make a size 14 and it turned out absolutely huge?? This is where the "finished measurements" come in. On my shorts pattern here, you can see that they've included this information in a separate box on the pattern envelope. This must be a new feature they're adding, because this is the first time I've noticed it and what a grand addition it is! This chart will tell you how big around your finished pair of shorts will be! Grab a measuring tape and wrap it around your model, it's that simple. 

How to read a sewing pattern by pincutsewstudio.com

For patterns that do not include this on the outside, however, you can find these finished measurements on the pattern pieces themselves. Let's take one of my own recently sewn pattern as an example. On the front piece, you will always be able to find a large circle with a plus sign in it. This is your bust point and this is where you'll find that list of finished measurements. So my full bust measurement is 35" and for a woven fabric (non-stretchy, remember?), I want to have about 2" of ease (breathing room). You can see on my pattern piece, I'm going to make a size 10. 

How to read sewing patterns by pincutsewstudio.com

These finished measurements can also be found at the waist line and at the hip line, always on the "front" pieces. These make it very easy to grade between sizes. So if I were making a dress and my bust point says to make a 10, but I need a 12 in the hips, I simply grade up in the hips. Below is a dress pattern where I have used this method in the past and you can see what I mean by grading. You can see where I was cutting a small through the top and swerved over to a medium by the time I got to the hip point (see those finished garment measurements I was talking about at the hip point?) 

how to read sewing patterns by pincutsewstudio.com

This may all seem complicated, but I promise it is not! In fact, it's the beautiful part of being able to sew your own clothing! How many of you have fitting issues that make it hard to shop for yourself? Are you tall and can't find dresses that are long enough on you? Are you pear shaped and can't find tops and dresses that don't gape in the upper body while fitting your lower half? Are you fuller in the belly and wish you could find shapes to flatter you? Are you short waisted like me and find that all your tops bunch up in the lower back? Are you long and lean like my daughter? When we sew for Natalie, we cut a girls size 10, but use the length of the size 16! She's 13, for reference. Here is a cute denim jumper she recently made herself: 

Burda 9356 Sewing pattern

What I'm trying to say is that once you start sewing for yourself and figure out your size and fit adjustments, you will have reason to celebrate because you can make clothes to fit your own unique body and learn to flatter your figure! And, I might add, you'll become a more savvy shopper because you'll know what good fit looks like. You may even find yourself noticing other peoples' fit problems and wanting to tell them there's a better way ;) 

Be sure and come back for Part 3 of the series, when we'll open up that pattern and decipher all those diagrams and terms on the instruction sheets! And if you missed part 1, you can find that right here

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Mason Jar Pin Cushion Tutorial

I have sewing classes coming up so I needed a fast way to make extra pin cushions! I was at WalMart of all places and they had some cute jar pin cushions that I thought I could copy pretty easily. While I was at it, I made a tutorial for you! I've tried to make this very beginner friendly, but if you have questions, don't hesitate to ask :)

Learn to make DIY mason jar pin cushions with some fabric, trim, a jar and a glue gun! || Pin Cut Sew Studio #pincushion #tutorial #howtosew #easysewing

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

These are super easy, free to make (if you already have jars lying around, that is) and don't even require any machine sewing! 

Let's get started. You'll need a mason jar with a lid, a scrap of fabric, a hot glue gun, stuffing and some fun trim. Plus a needle and thread. My favorite is this short, wide style of jar!

The first step is to hot glue the flat lid piece into the lid rim. Don't burn yourself like I did! I got this glue gun from a thrift store, still in its 90's packaging and it gets waaaaay hotter than the newer glue guns. The thing is dangerous, haha. I wonder if someone lobbied to get the temperature of glue guns regulated, hahahaha! 

Next, cut a circle from your fabric. I made my circle about 1.25 inches larger on all sides than my lid. For the small size lid, my circle measured 5 1/2 inches in diameter if that helps you, but it's not rocket science. 

Next, take your needle and thread, (thread your needle and knot the end together) and add long basting stitches all the way around the circle, about 1/4" from the raw edge. These long stitches allow you to gather the fabric up by pulling on the thread. Like so:

Do this all the way around!

Do this all the way around!

When you get back around to where you started, don't knot or cut your thread, just leave the needle attached! Then pull up the gathering stitches until your pouf is about the size it needs to be to fit over your jar lid. Adjust the gathers so they're generally even all the way around. 

Begin hot gluing the fabric onto the lid, starting where the knotted end of your thread is and working around to where your needle is hanging. You want to leave that end loose until the end so you can pull the needle to adjust the fit as needed. Stop gluing once you have about a 2 inch space to fill with stuffing. 

Next, add the stuffing, small pieces at a time. You want to fill it pretty full so it's nice and firm! 

Once it's filled, pull on the end of your thread to make the gathers fit snug and then knot your thread and snip. 

Then, finish gluing the opening to the lid. 

Almost done! All you have to do is glue your trim around to hide the thread and raw edges. 

That's all! Screw the lid onto your jar, where you can store extra pins, quilting pins or other little sewing gadgets. 

Mason Jar Pin Cushion tutorial

Mason Jar Pin Cushion tutorial

I've made two, but think I'll need to make a couple more. I think using the tiny jars would be super cute! If you make this tutorial, be sure and let me know, I'd love to see!

Cheers and happy sewing :) 

Mason Jar PIn Cushion tutorial|| Pin Cut Sew Studio #masonjar #crafts #diy #pincushion
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