Green Shirt Dress: Simplicity 8014

I really love green! I always have. Do you guys remember the “Color Me Beautiful” quiz from the 80’s (I think) that categorized you into a season and told you what colors to wear? I’m pretty sure I was a Spring, and most greens are probably Fall colors, but I don’t care, I like to wear it anyway. It does need to be a certain shade to look good on me, though. If it has too much yellow, it’s a no go.

I’d been pinning several green shirt dresses to my style board on Pinterest, where there are no shortage of styling ideas for a piece like I had in mind. A quick search on Gap’s website alone comes up with three fabulous green shirt dresses, like this green denim one, this maxi version and this one (my favorite!).

When I spotted a pretty green cotton fabric with great texture at Hobby Lobby, mixed in with the Halloween and pumpkin prints, I immediately bought some. It was just such a perfect weight for garment sewing, so I thought it would make a great green shirt dress for Fall.

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Green shirt dress with Simplicity pattern 8014 || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewing #shirtdress #diyfashion #simplicitypatterns

I’m pretty happy with how it turned out! I already had a couple shirt dress patterns on hand, but since one of my favorite sewing bloggers, Emily Hallman, has said good things about this one, I went with Simplicity 8014. I made a muslin and to my amazement, it needed zero alterations! That never happens to me, but I wasn’t going to argue with it.

I did have a bit of drama with the buttons. To make a long story short, the snaps I bought at Hobby Lobby don’t function and need to be taken off the shelves. I didn’t read reviews on them first, but if I had, I could have saved myself the trouble. Since I had already purchased them (AND the corresponding snap pliers), I didn’t want to spend more money on different snaps. I also didn’t want to go all the way to Joann. I really was set on the look of snaps, though, ugh! I was being so picky!

Green shirt dress, Simplicity 8104 || Pin Cut Sew Studio #diyfashion #shirtdress #simplicitypatterns

I slept on it and it occurred to me I don’t actually need the buttons to function. It’s not like I’d be wearing it unbuttoned! I had managed to figure out how to attach the snap fronts, just not the backs, so I went ahead and installed them on the front placket and then … I sewed the front shut from the top snap to the bottom one, right along the top stitching on the placket. I can get the dress on over my head just fine and no one will be the wiser (except for you, because I just told you ;) It has the added bonus of not being at risk of gaping open between the buttons!

Problem solved.

I find there’s a lot in sewing that requires problem solving skills (wait until you hear about my latest jacket adventure!) and that’s actually one of the things I really like about this hobby. Don’t you feel like sometimes having to make do, or come up with a creative solution, ends up being what you like best about a project? Happy accidents abound in sewing.

Cheers!

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One Pattern, Two Hacks: Butterick 6686

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links, at no additional cost to you. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Every now and then a pattern comes along that fits perfectly and can be remade in a myriad of ways! Butterick 6686 has been one of those for me. It’s one of the new Butterick patterns and the thing that appealed to me most about it was the sleeves. No set in sleeves meant I likely wouldn’t have to do a full bust adjustment (party!) and I like how these sleeves give freedom of movement. That said, I did make some significant changes, but first let me show you my two makes!

Pattern hacking with Butterick 6686. Click over to see how I made two very different tops out of two very different fabrics, with one simple pattern. || PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

The first version I made was out of cotton gingham from Hobby Lobby. I got it when they were clearancing out the Spring fashion line, so it was very inexpensive and a great quality. I did make a muslin like always and I’m glad I did because I ended up getting rid of all the gathers in the back. Here’s a line drawing for reference.

LIne drawing of Butterick 6686. Come see how I hacked this basic pattern into two very different tops! || Pin, Cut Sew Studio

Every time there are gathers or pleats in the back of a top or dress, it tends to look very odd on me, especially from the side. I prefer things to skim my back and because I have a swayback, I almost always alter patterns in the back. However, the width at the hemline was perfect, so I didn’t want to alter that at all. I grabbed my tape and got to work taping pleats into my pattern piece. Here’s how it looked when I was done.

Pattern alterations for swayback. Butterick 6686

Additionally, I altered the armhole to not come out as far. It’s hard to explain, but I didn’t like how far down the bottom of the sleeve was and how it came out in a hook shape. I eliminated that and marked where I would stop sewing in order to hem my sleeve. You can see that dot in the photo above.

ALSO, I don’t care for collars that are one piece, I prefer the collar and stand to be separate. So I used the collar and stand pieces of my trusty button down shirt pattern and it just happened to fit this pattern perfectly. These changes may sound time consuming, but they really weren’t and the end result was so worth it. I think if I hadn’t bothered with a muslin and alterations and just plowed ahead with my nice fabric, it would have ended up in the trash. It’s always worth taking my time!

Butterick 6686 by Nikki at Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

For my second version, I had a really pretty, buttery soft rayon I’d gotten on my trip to Colorado. I didn’t have much of it, though, so I needed a pattern that doesn’t use much fabric. Because it doesn’t have sleeves to cut out and because I took out the gathers, this pattern is perfect for just a yard and a quarter of fabric. This time I did something a little different. Rather than the collar, I made a bias binding for the neckline and left the tie ends long. I love how it drapes open at the neckline!

Butterick 6686. Click over to see how I hacked one basic pattern into two very different shirts for summer! || Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

This pattern is perfect for hacking. Do you have a go-to pattern that you can hack into other things? I’d love to hear about it in the comments!

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Wide Legged Cropped Pants: McCall's 7786

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links.  For more info, see my disclosure policy.

I made something kinda different for me! I feel like fashion trends have made a greater shift this past year than they have for the past few years. It seems like flowier things are back in, jeans trends are changing (It seriously took me forever to get on board with skinny jeans. I remember thinking surely they wouldn’t stick around, but boy did they! Now that I love them, I feel the trend shifting away, of course. As long as low rise stays in the past, I’m good).

Anyway, I originally only bought McCalls 7786 because Natalie, my 14-year-old tried on a similar pair at American Eagle and you know I wasn’t about to spend $35 on rayon pants I could make so easily. I never dreamed I’d make this look for myself, but I had this rayon that was singing pants to me so I just had to try out the look and I LOVE IT.

McCall’s 7786 Wide Legged Pants

My two favorite things about these pants are the pockets (duh) and that they have a flat waistband in the front, but elastic in the back. Brilliant, I wish jeans were made the same way. I made the plain, long version, but cropped the length. As you can see, mine are boring compared to the other options on this pattern. I wasn’t ready to get too crazy, though, haha.

McCall’s 7786

I know I’ll get a lot of wear out of these this Summer! Rayon is such a cool, breathable fabric, it’s pretty much my favorite. I don’t think that will surprise anyone who’s been following me for any length of time. This fabric came from Colorado Fabrics during my last trip to Denver, but here are some at good prices that I think would be beautiful in this pattern (I dare you to make flamingo pants):

Rayon Pants, McCall’s 7786

To complete this outfit, my shoes are White Mountain (similar here) and my shirt is from Target, which you can still buy. It’s a lightweight rayon jersey. I have it in two colors and find them very versatile.

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Because loungewear should be pretty

I sewed a robe!! It's soooo pretty. I had a robe already. But it was a shade of gray that just looked terrible on me! So I had a pattern and ordered some knits from Girl Charlee just specifically to make a robe! 

I used McCall's 7516 and it went together pretty easily, The front and hood are one pattern piece, so the construction is different than anything I've made before, but worked great. 

I truly believe that women should feel pretty is everything we wear and that includes loungewear and p.j.'s! If you have to wear them, they might as well be cute. I have made some other loungewear patterns, but the one that I'm most happy to recommend is this chick boxer pattern by EvielaLuveDIY on Etsy.  I made three pair in one day and wear them all the time. Check out her shop because she has such beautiful patterns and kits! 

I've really been having to carve out time for personal sewing lately. I have several knits I'd like to sew up before we move in a couple months, but the to-do list is also starting to compound, so I'm trying to carve out and hour here and there to whip through some projects. It's a good thing I'm fast! 

 

 

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The Maker's Tote: a pattern review

It had been a long time since I'd made a bag, much less two of the same pattern! I wanted to make a special gift for a friend, though and had pinned this Maker's Tote pattern by Noodlehead recently and I knew this was what I wanted to make. 

Luckily, my Hawaii fabric store sells a lot of Cotton & Steel prints! I picked out a few favorites and got to work. Here is how my first version, the larger option, turned out! 

I absolutely love it and what's more, I loved making it!! There was nothing frustrating about this pattern, everything fit together just like it was supposed to. This is pdf pattern and you don't even have to print and tape a bunch of pieces! She includes measurements for cutting, so you will need a rotary cutting set. And there is a template for rounding the corners. 

And the inside!! Let's admire these fab pockets, shall we??

So many great pockets! There's also a zipper pocket on the back exterior that I don't have a photo of. The purpose of this tote is obvious by the name, I think. I made my friend the large one because I think she'll use it mostly for larger projects, like quilts (it's that big!) She'll be able to tote projects around and work on them anywhere. 

DSC_0013.jpg

A few things to note. First, I added the little tab on the end of the zipper. The pattern calls for a separating zipper, but it's really not necessary that it separate, a normal zipper will work as long as it's long enough for the bag to still open fully. Second, the pattern calls for fusible flex foam in the interior. I don't have access to that here, didn't have time to order it, and I like to use what I have on hand anyway. I just used cotton batting. It worked fine, although I'm sure fusible flex foam is a great product. 

I made little zipper pulls from the selvedges because Cotton & Steel makes their selvedge edges too cute to scrap!  

Since I loved how this one turned out so much, I decided to get to work right away on one for myself! I chose the smaller version this time, because I want to use it for knitting and crochet projects, which are what I work out when I'm waiting at dance or golf. 

I chose another great Cotton & Steel print and then made it work with fabrics from my stash. I LOVE IT! I've used it quite a bit already and shamelessly showed it off to everyone I saw, ha! 

I used a few products making these that I think you'll find useful. (FYI these are affiliate links).

  • YYK handbag zippers. These zippers are the absolute best!!! They have come in handy time and time again and they come in beautiful colors. 
  • Babyville snap plyers and snaps. Another investment that has been well worth the money, I use these snaps on everything. Again, so many pretty colors. 
  • I can't say enough good things about sewing clips, they're so useful! Definitely used them a lot in this project. 
  • And here is that fusible flex foam that I didn't use this time, but would love to try next time.
sewing clips! 

sewing clips! 

That's all! I wasn't given this pattern or asked to review it, I just really love it! I know I'll try more Noodlehead patterns in the future because this one was such a delight to sew :) 

Oh look, I found a photo of that zipper pocket! A tad blurry, but that's ok. 

Cheers! Happy sewing :)

 

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