Unrelated: Vol. 2

Happy Sunday! Sundays are my favorite days. Church, Mod Pizza, then Broncos, or sewing, or reading, or book store wandering, or just generally relaxing. I try to do all my school planning and other must-do-by-Monday things (like writing this post, for example, haha) before Sunday so none of that is weighing on me, which can make for full Saturdays, but it’s worth it when Sunday comes!

Anyway, I’m back with the second edition of “Unrelated”, where I share with you, my tribe, five things I’m loving that aren’t related to sewing. I’m really loving sharing these tid-bits with you and it’s been fun to keep a mental list of the things I just have to put in the next edition of Unrelated.

First, though, we did make the wreath idea I included in last week’s edition! It was fun to make this with the kids and we smile every time we pull into the driveway :)

I made a DIY Fall pinecone wreath!. Click over for the link to the great tutorial! || Pin Cut Sew Studio #falldecor #wreath #diy

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Let’s get to this week’s five favorite things!

One:

Thriftbooks! Oh my goodness, my friend told me about thrift books a few months ago and I cannot get enough. Every time I place an order, it almost feels too good to be true. Thriftbooks is pretty much what you’d imagine, an online store store for used books. The best part is that you get free shipping for orders over $10 and you earn a free book every now and then when you get enough points from your purchases. Most titles cost $3.99 and many I’ve bought have been in new condition. I’ve found all genres of books on my to-read list, including homeschool books. BEST PART, you can get a 15% discount on your first order by clicking over through this link!

Two:

Grain Free Granola recipe by Iowa Girl Eats. I can’t eat gluten, it gives me awful headaches. Most store-bought granolas contain wheat, so I was buying this Grain Free granola from Target. It’s pricey for a pretty small bag, though, so I sought out a recipe and this one delivered, big time! It’s soooooo good, I’ve made it twice now and it lasts for about a week, even with my kids snacking on it. I put it on my cheerios, my yogurt, or just eat as a snack on it’s own.

Three:

Besides sewing, photography is a favorite hobby of mine. I go to Barnes & Noble to peruse the magazines sometimes and the other day I grabbed the newest edition of Shutter Magazine. The black and white theme is what caught my eye. I browsed through it at home and it’s really inspiring! It’s what led to my challenging myself to post a black and white photo every day on my personal Instagram account, which has been really fun so far. If there are any photographers in your life, a subscription to Shutter magazine would be a good gift idea. If you’re a photographer yourself, It looks like you can access the digital editions for free, which is pretty cool!

Here is a photo I took of Layla the very day I bought the magazine. I always have a willing subject at hand when inspiration strikes ;)

Black and White photography || Pin Cut Sew Studio

Four:

I bought this pair of olive and rose gold Puma sneakers at my thrift store last month. They were in like new condition, so I really lucked out and I ended up LOVING these shoes. They are so, so comfy and bendy. I like them so much, I’m thinking of ordering this similar pair in the elderberry color, because you know, a girl’s gotta have options. I do however, use inserts in all my shoes. I have one good pair with nice arch support that I just switch from shoes to shoes. So when I get new shoes, I rip the original inserts out and use my good ones. Even in my running shoes. I’ve been doing this for a few years now and it’s opened up a whole new world of shoe options for me! I have scoliosis and my body would just start to hurt if I wore shoes that didn’t have the right support. So, if you have knee, ankle, hip or back pain, might I suggest the first thing you try should be good inserts for your shoes? I recommend Vionics or similar brand, NOT the gel or memory foam kind and not the cheapo kinds you can get at Walmart. Lecture over, ha!

Five:

I was at Hobby Lobby today and they carry the oh-so-popular CC hats. We have a few of the hats and they are pretty great. The range of CC products has expanded though and now they have gloves too! AND, they’re “smart tips” gloves, so they claim you can use your thumb and finger to access your phone while wearing them. I was skeptical because I have tried on gloves that make these claims in the past and they really didn’t work at all. But, I tried them on and played with my phone there in Hobby Lobby and they worked! I didn’t buy them, but I want to and Amazon has lots more color choices than they had at Hobby Lobby, so I think I’m gonna go with the oatmeal confetti color.

Here’s a photo I took of Natalie in her CC hat last year. She’s had this hat a few years now and it’s still in great shape.

Pin Cut Sew Studio #fallphotography #ccbeanie

That’s five things! Please tell me what unrelated things you’ve been loving lately! Be sure and come back tomorrow to see my September thrift store haul, it’s a fun one.

Cheers!

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Five Things to Sew This Weekend: Fall Edition

Of all the seasons, I think Fall invokes the most feelings. When you imagine Fall, vivid pictures enter your mind; colors, foods, objects, the smell in the air, the feel of the chilly breezes. Everything just seems so rusty and burnt orange, so soft and cozy, like we can relate to the hibernating animals, innately knowing it's time to wrap up the outside life and prepare for the season of being indoors with our blankets, slippers and hot tea.

That Fall scent is in the air here in Northern Utah and it give me all the feels. I wish it could last a big longer before Winter hits and the true hibernation begins, but in the mean time, I will start some Fall sewing projects and share my top five Fall weekend sewing ideas here with you, in case you feel the need to sew something cozy too.

Five thing to sew for Fall that you can sew up this weekend! Click over for my top favorite sewing tutorial and patterns for Fall. || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewing #fall #diy #pumkincrafts

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.


One:

How to sew a fleece blanket by Sugar Bee Crafts. Ok, I know, fleece blankets are everywhere, but I really love this one because it’s actually sewn together with a front and a back, not just tied or finished with a zig-zag, AND has those fabulous big pom-poms. I think these would make great gifts, especially if you use nice anti-pill fleece.

Two:

Chenille Fabric Pumpkins by Flamingo Toes. I adore these! I’ve made some fabric pumpkins, but the texture of these ones is so great, and the raffia adds a special touch, plus the vintage baby spoons for stems!? C’mon. So cute. I love the colors she chose too, unconventional colors always add something unique to traditional projects. Find some chenille options here.

Three:

Arm warmer tutorial on the Califabrics blog. I like arm warners because my other hobby is photography and I use them to keep my hands kinda warm while keeping the necessary fingers free. This project is super cute and could really use up some knit scraps! And they’d be way faster than the knitted pair I made several years ago, ha! (For real, knitting takes forever … or I’m just really slow at it).

Four:

Hey June released the Evans Blazer today and I’m dying. She makes the BEST patterns for people like me, who dress casually most of the time. I like how she styled each different blazer she made for the post too. Just love it and definitely plan to buy the pattern and make one (or three). I just need to find the right fabrics. Maybe this for my first one.

Five:

Pumpkin Sky Pillow by Carried Away Quilting. I really like this quilt block, especially the white pumpkin idea. It’s a pillow here, but I’m thinking of making it as a mini quilt. It will be fun to go through my scraps to find some fabrics to sew this up this weekend. Seems like a relaxing little project for me!



That’s five! I definitely want to fit in some serious sewing time this weekend! It’s been pretty busy around here this week, so I’m going to try to carve out time to sew on Saturday and Sunday afternoon.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this edition of five things to sew this weekend. Here’s a link to all the previous editions.

Cheers : )



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DIY Fortnite Costume

If you have a son of a certain age, chances are you're scratching your head wondering how exactly to put together a costume for whatever particular Fortnite character he's asking to be for Halloween. I have to admit, the graphics and skins on that game are super fun! Some are easier to turn into costumes than others, and luckily last year my son wanted to be one of those easier guys. His name is Dire and he's a werewolf-like character on Fortnite.

Today I'm going to show you how to DIY a Fortnite Halloween costume! Well, ok, just one Fortnite costume for now, but you'll want to read about the works-for-every-animal-costume hat pattern towards the end!

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How to make a DIY Fortnite Dire costume! || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewing #fortnite #costume #diy

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Here's what Level 3 Dire looks like, this is what we were going for.

How to make a DIY Fortnite Dire Costume || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewing #fortnite #costume #DIY

When creating costumes, I try to break it down, one piece at a time. Some parts were easy. We thrifted a pair of jeans and a flannel shirt, plus a black jacket. Then I only needed to deconstruct these pieces to resemble Dire's ripped up look. I ripped up the jeans and cut them shorter with a raggedy edge. I ripped the sleeves off the jacket and cut the flannel shirt hem off to look ripped. The gray base layer is a thermal set we bought from Target. I didn't want to damage the thermals because he continued to wear them as long underwear last Winter.

I bought a half a yard of fur from Hobby Lobby (with a coupon of course because fur is pricey!) I sewed some patches of fur behind the holes in the jeans and created cap sleeves for the black vest to make furry shoulders.

How to make a DIY Fortnite Dire Costume || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewing #fortnite #costume #DIY

My favorite tip here is the hat! I was asked to make several different animal hats for a Narnia production at our homeschool co op a few years ago and I used the same hat pattern to make every one of them, in various fleeces and furs, just adding different ears and the appropriate animal characteristics. The pattern is Simplicity 8273, View C and I pulled it out again to make Dire's hat. I made it from the fur, adding wolf ears to the top seam and it turned out perfectly.

How to make a DIY Fortnite Dire Costume || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewing #fortnite #costume #DIY

Below is a photo of the same hat pattern, this time as Mr. Tumnus, the fawn. It's also been used to make a unicorn, horses, a bearded man, beavers and a wolf. There's probably more, but I can't think. It so easy to create ears and transform this pattern into all kinds of things! The pattern is drafted with a cross of seams in the top, so adding ears and say, a mane, doesn't change the way you'd construct the hat, you just baste your extra animal parts in before closing those seams. For the fir versions, I left out the lining, but for the fleece versions, I did include the lining.

How to use Simplicity 8273 to DIY any animal hat. I’ve made SO MANY animal hats, including Mr. Tumnus from Narnia shown here, with this pattern. || PIn Cut Sew Studio #diycostumes #sewing #costume #animalhat

This year, Kelby has toyed with being Drift, which I think would be pretty simple. Or the Guaco skin, which may not be so easy, because of the taco face, ha! But we can do it!

OF COURSE I know not everyone enjoys making costumes as much as I do. So if you’d rather eat a bug than spend your precious sewing time making video game characters, Amazon has great Fortnite costumes too, so you can always just buy your kid a costume, no guilt allowed ;)



I'll have costume sewing updates as we get going on them this month! Natalie is still set on Eliza Doolittle and Layla wants to be an 80's Jazzercizer, which I think is HILARIOUS. Must find the white puffy L.A. Gears.

If you missed it last week, here is my post about our Harry Potter Hermione DIY costume and here is a whole post about cosplay: what the heck it is and how you can get started.

Cheers!

DIY Fortnite Dire Costume || PIn Cut Sew Studio #diy #costume #fortnite
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Unrelated: Vol. 1

This happens to me ALL the time: I try and love a recipe, I devour a great book, I come across a fascinating article online, or I find a product I'm crazy about and I DESPERATELY want to share it with you all. BUT, this is a sewing blog! I'm supposed to blog about sewing!

But, who says I can't share these unrelated things with you, right? This is my blog, after all, and you are my tribe. Chances are, if we relate to each other about sewing things, we may relate to each other over non-sewing things too.

So, without further ado, welcome to Volume 1 of "Unrelated", where I will recommend to you five things I am loving, but are unrelated to sewing. Look for a new edition every Sunday!

First though, here’s a photo of my pretty Fall living room :)

Fall living room || Pin Cut Sew Studio #livingroom #decor #Fall

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Let’s get to it!

First,

if you’re a fan of C.S. Lewis (who am I kidding, of course you are ;), I’ve loved these two books of his complied letters, Letters to an American Lady and Letters to Children. Of course he was a brilliant man and author, but there is something about reading his letters to others that gives insight into his life and mind and let me tell you, he was so funny.

Second,

I’m going to Hobby Lobby today to buy supplies for this Fall wreath. The kids and I are going to make it together. We’ll have to go hunt down some pine cones first because the only ones at the park nearest our house are too skinny.

Third,

I’ve made this recipe a bunch of times. It’s one Instant Pot recipe that I feel is truly instant. I can make it in literally 15 minutes in between running my girls to dance. It’s crowd pleaser too! We had a house guest recently and he gobbled it up, asked for the recipe, then made it for a crowd when he got home. Everyone loves it.

Fourth,

we homeschool as you may know, and my son was wanting to learn to type (he’s 11). Rather than purchasing software, we poked around online to see what there was for free. This site is perfect! He’s learning so quickly and it makes a fun vintage typewriter noise as he types, which for some reason, I love.

Fifth

and last, there is this Instagram account called Cheap Old Houses and it’s soooo much fun to follow. If you’re like me and are obsessed with browsing realtor.com just to see what’s out there in various cities and states, you’ll love this account.

That’s five! Please tell me what you’re loving right now!

Simple Fall living room decor || PIn Cut Sew Studio #livingroom #falldecor #simpleliving

BTW, those little fabric pumpkins are from the Target Dollar Spot. You can get a set of 8 here :)

Cheers!

Nikki

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Kon Marie Your Sewing Room

If you haven’t read the book, The Lifechanging Magic of Tidying Up, you’ve no doubt heard of the corresponding reality TV series, in which the decluttering guru Marie Kondo helps people dig out of their mess and organize their belongings.

I read the book a few years ago and while there were a few things that were just too hokey for me (I don’t thank my belongings for serving me before putting them in the Goodwill bag, for example), I did glean some organization tips from that book that were pretty life-changing. (I mean, not like the births of my children life changing, but you know …)

One strategy in particular and one that I have now employed in my home for three or four years, is the KonMarie method of folding and storing clothing. Not only did this revolutionize my dresser, it changed how I store and view my fabric stash and sewing notions. That’s what I want to talk to you about today!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

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Here’s how I organize my sewing room using the best tip from organization guru, Marie Kondo! Come see my best tips for how to keep your sewing room neat and organized, KonMarie style. || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #konmarie #craftroom #organization

Marie Kondo recommends, rather than folding your clothes and stacking them in your drawers, fold them set them upright, file-style. The rows of garments are nice and neat and you can see everything in the drawer, never having to dig to find clothes under other clothes. Brilliant!

Here’s how I organize my sewing room using the best tip from organization guru, Kon Marie Kondo! Come see my best tips for how to keep your sewing room neat and organized. || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #konmarie #craftroom #organization

I store my fabric the same way. If you missed it, I blogged about my DIY cutting table we made from a secondhand dresser last week. The drawers hold all my fabrics. I even have a bin of small scrap fabrics inside one drawer that would ordinarily be strewn into a messed up pile, but are neatly folded and filed in a drawer. I have a drawer of “filed” garment fabrics, a drawer of quilting/cotton fabrics and a drawer of fleeces. My holiday fabrics are folded and filed just as neatly and share a drawer with the aforementioned scraps bin.

Here’s how I organize my sewing room using the best tip from organization guru, Kon Marie Kondo! Come see my best tips for how to keep your sewing room neat and organized. || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #konmarie #craftroom #organization

But thinking beyond fabric, this method works well for my patterns too. I have the patterns neatly filed into one drawer. I don’t allow myself to keep more patterns than fit in the drawer. I know the thought of limiting your pattern stash this much may give some of you a heart attack, but having fewer patters eliminates a crazy amount of decision fatigue and I’ve experienced so many benefits of my massive pattern clear out!

Here’s how I organize my sewing room using the best tip from organization guru, Kon Marie Kondo! Come see my best tips for how to keep your sewing room neat and organized. || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #konmarie #craftroom #organization

I have a second small cabinet in my sewing room that holds thread, notions, interfacing and other small things. My Father-in-law built this cabinet for me many years ago and having several smaller drawers right next to my machine is so handy.

Here’s how I organize my sewing room using the best tip from organization guru, Kon Marie Kondo! Come see my best tips for how to keep your sewing room neat and organized. || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #konmarie #craftroom #organization

I organize my thread by color in one drawer and store my ribbons and trims KonMarie-style in another drawes, nice and neat in rows, (though those crazy ribbons need reorganized on occassion!) My rick-rack, bias tape and piping get filed in a bin inside one drawer.

Here’s how I organize my sewing room using the best tip from organization guru, Kon Marie Kondo! Come see my best tips for how to keep your sewing room neat and organized. || Pin Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #konmarie #craftroom #organization

This method of storing items in my sewing room has been so useful for me and I’ll never go back! Having fabrics in drawers keeps them safe from sun damage and dust too. Also, restricting your storage to only the space you’ve made available for it truly helps you not overbuy. And this leads me to one thing I wish Marie Kondo addressed more on her show and in her book. “Tidying up” is great and all, but If we want to keep a tidy home for the long haul, we must address our shopping habits. It’s not going to work if we continue to bring in new items at the same rate we always did before the clean-out sesh, right?

Do you have thoughts on this?? I’d love to hear them and your thoughts on sewing room organization in general. Are you a keeper or a purger?







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DIY Cutting Table From a Secondhand Dresser

We have less than a year left in our current home until the Army moves us onward, and one of the things I’m already mourning is my giant sewing room. I’ve sewn in all kinds of spaces over the years, including a corner of the living room, a dingy basement and a tiny hallway. But our current house has a large bonus room in the daylight basement and I’ve had it all to myself for two years.

I will survive the loss of space, but knowing that my amazing, but huge cutting table will likely not fit in whatever sewing space I have in our next house is the saddest part! We DIYed this cutting table for the sewing studio out of a second-hand dresser and I just have to share it with you because it’s been an amazing solution to the typical sewing room storage mess/problems.

How to make a DIY crafting or cutting table from any old dresser! || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #diyfurniture #craftroom

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

This table came about almost accidentally. My husband’s dresser fell apart during our last move and he needed a new one. He found one on the for-sale page in our area, huge and hand built out of solid wood. It was part of a set, however, so he had to buy both. I already have a dresser I like and this one was way too big for our room anyway, but I knew right away it would be perfect for my sewing room!

I painted it a pretty dark blue color and bought new drawer pulls at Hobby Lobby (these ones). Casey put it on castors both to make it taller and easier to move. Then he replaced the dresser’s top with a 4x8 piece of pre-finished plywood from Home Depot. I wanted it larger than the original top so that it overhangs on both sides and on the back, almost like a kitchen island would.

How to make a DIY crafting or cutting table from any old dresser! || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #diyfurniture #craftroom

The best part about this cutting table is that it stores my entire fabric stash, patterns and notions. I do not like a visually busy home in general and that’s just as true in my sewing room. I prefer everything to be put away and enclosed. Also, a tidy home tip for you: when you limit your storage space for certain items, it encourages you to use what you have, buy less in general and just be more mindful of how much you’re accumulating. This is true for every area of the home! I’ve had a couple of very small kitchens, my current one included, and they have been my most organized kitchens because everything needs to have a home. There’s simply no space for extras, so I think long and hard before adding something new to the mix.

This is my fabric stash, housed on one side of my cutting table (the other side holds one drawer of fleece and felt):

How to make a DIY crafting or cutting table from any old dresser! || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #diyfurniture #craftroom

The center section has a door that opens and three sliding drawers that pull out. This is where I keep certain notions, other craft supplies like embroidery floss and beads, my button box and a bin of laces and trims.

How to make a DIY crafting or cutting table from any old dresser! || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #diyfurniture #craftroom

The top left drawer holds all my patterns. This is all of them and when it's overfull, I go through and get rid of some. I talk more about the concept of having less of a fabric and pattern stash in this post.

How to make a DIY crafting or cutting table from any old dresser! || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #diyfurniture #craftroom

This concept will work with any size dresser. The key to a great cutting table is to give it enough height and a large top. It’s a budget friendly idea too, as you can obtain an inexpensive secondhand dresser pretty easily these days. The 4x8 prefab top we put on mine was $50. Another option to use an old flat door or find a tabletop for a good price that will work. Frugality requires creativity! We’re often surprised by how we can repurpose items we already have on hand.

How to make a DIY crafting or cutting table from any old dresser! || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingroom #diyfurniture #craftroom

Someday soon I’ll show you the other side of my sewing room (the side with the sewing machines!) I’d love to see your sewing space too! Link me in the comments :)

Cheers!




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A Free Sewing Printable!

I am so excited about what I have to share with you today! My blog readership has been growing so much lately and I really wanted to make something special to say thank you. I created a free printable to-do list for my email newsletter subscribers! If you have already entered your email here on my site, you should have already received your freebie. Not yet a subscriber? Not to worry! Read on :)

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Free sewing printables! Print your free “I’d Rather be sewing” to-do lists by hopping over to the Pin Cut Sew Studio blog.  #freeprintables #sewingprintables #todolists #freesewing

This post contains affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.


I only recently became a to-do list person when I found myself lying awake at night thinking about all the things I had to do the next day, only to wake up and sort of wander around wondering what I should do next! Can you relate? I’m especially bad at getting to piddly administrative tasks, like making appointments, or placing an order for something not fun (I have no problem placing orders for the fun things, ha!) Starting to make a to-do list each morning boosted my productivity big time! It’s also helped me realize what amount of tasks will realistically fit into my day while leaving margin for rest and hobbies. Knowing these limitations really helps me see which things can be moved to tomorrow, or maybe that aren’t important at all and can be let go of altogether.

I’ve been making to-do lists on any paper I can find handy, but these “I’d rather be sewing” lists are obviously so more more fun. Of course, you can also use them for shopping lists, menu planning or love notes, it is up to you. I printed several, cut them apart with my paper trimmer (if you don’t have one of these, you need one, they’re so handy!) and stapled them together at the top with my homeschool-mom-heavey-duty-stapler.

Ready for your free printable lists?? Just fill out the form below and check your email. Once you confirm your email, you’ll receive the link to download your freebie. That’s it!

Once again, thank you from the bottom of my heart for being here and being interested enough in my content to keep coming back. I’m honored and feel like I have a bunch of sewing friends out there, even if I’ve never met them in person. I love hearing from you all when someone takes the time to email me, so don’t be too shy to hit that reply button and tell me about yourself!

Cheers and Happy Sewing :)

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Five Things to Sew This Weekend

I’m back with five more amazing things to sew this weekend! Every other week, I pick the five best things I’ve spotted around the Internet recently and compile them here for you! If you’ve written a recent tutorial that you think might fit the bill, I’d love to know about it. Place your link in the comments and I’ll take a look!

Now that I’ve been blogging very consistently for several months, I can sort of see which posts are resonating with you, my readers. That makes it easier to tailor these Five Things posts to what you all seem to like the most (which incidentally tends to be the things I also like most, which bodes well for the future of my blog, ha!)

Let’s get to it.

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I’m back with five more amazing things to sew this weekend! Every other week, I pick the five best sewing tutorials I’ve spotted around the Internet recently and compile them here for you!  || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewingtutorials #weekendsewing #thingstosew #teensewing

This post contains affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Five Things to Sew This Weekend:

First up, Scrunchies!

I created a fun tutorial last week on how to sew scrunchies. Grab some friends and sew up some 90’s trends This video tutorial is very beginner-friendly, intended for teens and tweens to be able to make some scrunchies with a bunch of fun accessories, with little to no help.

Sew up some scrunchies this weekend! Grab some friends and learn to sew some 90’s fashion :) || PIn Cut Sew Studio #sewing #scrunchies #beginnersewing #teensewing

Next up, How to Sew Letters onto a Pillow by Swoodson Says.

I love this trend of words on pillows! Learn to sew letters onto a pillow with this tutorial. This method is similar to my tutorial for name banners, so this is very simple and the word options are endless. Word pillows are another project that would be so fun for kids and teens. Or using holiday words for various seasons is a great idea too.

Third, DIY Triangle Pattern Weights, by Easy Peasy Creative

I need some pattern weights sooooo bad! I usually end up using my tape dispenser, a pair of scissors and a magnetic pin cushion, but I was cutting out a sports bra yesterday and the pieces are too small for those makeshift pattern weights, but pins hated my fabric (I really should also get some ballpoint pins, since I’m sewing a lot more activewear these day). Anyway, this tutorial is a great idea and I can whip some up from scraps this weekend.

Fourth, Diamond-Front Backpack by ikat bag

This bag is incredible! I spotted this the same day my daughter and I had seen a bag shaped just like this at the dance store. You better believe I put all my stuff down to inspect that bag, haha. Such a cool shape and ikatbag breaks down how it’s made in this post.

Last but far from least, Jalie’s new Marie-Josee underwear pattern!

Ya’ll know I’m a huge fan of Jalie, but their latest pattern announcement is just the coolest. Now only did they create a beautiful underwear pattern, they included an ostomy option. I know someone who has an ostomy and it is clearly a life-altering experience. Not only did Jalie create a pattern to meet that specific need, they also stated, “100% of sales of this pattern will be donated to Centre Philou, a non-profit and charitable organization that provides specialized services to children with multiple disabilities and their families.”

I applaud Jalie for their generosity. And also, I love this pattern and am beyond glad that higher waisted everything is back in style, even for undies, ha! I just bought a very similar pair from Target and love them, so I’m thinking I’ll bust out some knit scraps and get to work this weekend.

Jalie underwear pattern with ostomy option. Grab some knit scraps and sew up some underwear this weekend! || PIn Cut Sew Studio

Do you have any weekend sewing plans? Please share!

Cheers and Happy Sewing :)

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My National Thrift Store Day Haul (and how sewing has made me a better thrifter)

I’d say about 30% of my wardrobe is handmade and another 60% comes from my local thrift shop. If you’ve been reading for awhile, you know I’m a frugal gal, so it will be no surprise that my go-to store is of the secondhand variety. I have always been a thrifter, my mom raised me right! Haha. My kids love the thrift shop too, especially now that they’re often shopping with their own money rather than mine, making them more aware of how much bang they’re getting for their buck. So imagine our delight when we found out this past Saturday was National Thrift Shopping Day! Woot, woot! Our favorite thrift store here where we live is Savers and they marked all their t-shirts down to .99 that day to mark the occasion. We are also very lucky that our particular Savers offers a military discount of 20% off every single day. As an Army family, we are very thankful for your support, Savers!

I got to thinking about how sewing and thrifting go hand in hand, so I’m going to show you my haul from that day, but while I’m at it, I’m going to share with you how I think being a sewer has made me so much better at shopping in general, and specifically at shopping secondhand.

PIN ME!

Come read the ways I think being able to sew has made me a better thrift shopper! | Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

This post contains affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

How Sewing Makes Us Better Thrifters:

We know fabrics.

Fabric content makes a massive difference in how your clothes will wear and wash, so knowing fabric content just by how it feels is a huge bonus when thrift shopping. And feeling fabrics is something sewists are pros at! Also, looking at the tag and seeing words like “viscose”, “nylon” or “linen” is Greek to many shoppers, but people who sew see those words on a regular basis, we know the cost difference between those fabrics and cheaper fabrics, we know which ones are breathable and which are sweaty, and we can tell which clothes are going to wash and wear well, and feel good when we put them on.

This is a viscose dress I thrifted on Saturday (with the tags still on!) The added bonus to knowing fabrics is knowing how to wash them. There are no washing instructions on the tag, but I know better than to put this one in the dryer!

Thrift store haul! Dress #1. Come see how I think sewing has made me a better thrifter. | PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

We know fit

Sewing clothing for ourselves gives us a sense of fit that the average shopper does not have. We all know sewists become quite particular about the fit of things over time, judging the fit of every garment that others are wearing, ha! Knowing how clothing is supposed to fit and being able to tell by looking at something whether or not it’s going to work is a skill that sewing develops in a person, for sure.

We know quality

There’s often a reason expensive brands are expensive, and quality has a lot to do with it. Sewers not only know quality fabrics, we know quality techniques and finishes. We study the construction of garments as a hobby, after all, so no one can spot shoddy workmanship quite like us!

This is an Eddie Bauer dress I got as part of my haul. Knowing quality brands when thrifting can really help you avoid purchasing cheap clothes that fall apart after a few wears. This dress is super soft and even the drawstring is high quality. It just feels really good to wear because of how well it’s made, the great fit and the nice, expensive-feeling fabric. (My shoes are White Mountain, similar here).

Thrift store haul! Dress #1. Come see how I think sewing has made me a better thrifter. | PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

We know what we like

When you spend your free time sewing your own clothing, you know what looks good and what doesn’t. Part of what people find frustrating or annoying about thrift shopping is that it’s such a hunt, you have to see everything to find the gems. However, when you shop with filters like quality fabrics, favorite brands, and styles you know look good on you, it’s easy to quickly pass over the junk to find the treasures. If I spot a high quality, nice brand sweater, but it has dolman sleeves that I know I don’t look good in, I move right along and remind myself someone else is going to get a real nice sweater because I passed it up.

Denim skirts and t-shirts seem like basics, but not all are created equal and not every jean skirt and not every t-shirt is going to flatter every body. I’m always on the lookout for a perfectly-shaped (for me) skirt and I scored this denim Gap skirt and Nike tee (new with tags and only .99 because of the sale!) as part of my haul on Saturday. (Find similar to my cute pink Nikes slides here).

Thrift store haul!  Come see how I think sewing has made me a better thrifter. | PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

We can alter and mend

This might be one of the best perks about being a sewing thrift shopper! So many people just give up on their nice clothes when they lose a button or rip a seam. Because we who sew can easily repair those minor flaws, we can score some great clothes for good deals. Also, simple alterations are easy for us to do and we can envision those needed alterations when trying on thrifted clothes. A too-long dress is not problem! Easy fix.

I got this top as part of my haul and it’s from Hollister. Not a store I would walk into to shop without my teen daughters (or with probably, if I’m being honest, haha), but I do love me some embroidery! It’s a little too swingy on me, I think, but I can just take hose side seams in if I decide to.

Thrift store haul! Come see how I think sewing has made me a better thrifter. | PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

We know what we’ll actually wear.

I had a friend once assume I have a huge wardrobe and was surprised when I told her I take up the least amount of closet space of anyone in our family. The difference is that I wear absolutely everything I keep, where most women have a closet full of clothes, but wear the same 10 things over and over. Because we spend valuable time making garments, it’s much more of a bummer when you find you never reach for some of them.

When I thrift shop, just like when I plan sewing projects, I consider what I actually wear on a daily basis. That’s why I always look in the tees, pants, hoodies, jackets and activewear sections of my thrift store. I was happy to find these Roxy joggers the other day. They’re nice quality fabric and I wore them all day on Sunday with no stretching out. I have a pair of black linen handmade joggers, but they’re definitely a lightweight Summer fabric. These will fill that hole for Fall!

Thrift store haul!  Come see how I think sewing has made me a better thrifter. | PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

I could probably write a dozen articles about ways sewing makes me a better fill-in-the-blank. What a great skill we have! Can you think of any other ways that you’re better at shopping because of your sewing life? I would love to hear what you would add to the list!

As for thrifting, I could write a dozen articles on that too. In recent months, we’ve found an Athleta linen jacket, these exact Adidas in like-new condition, Madewell jeans, a Victoria’s Secret swim suit with the tags still on and plenty more. Once you go thrifty, you’ll never go back! Lol, I just made that up, but it’s true.

Cheers!

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Bleach Dyed Denim Costa Tote

Does anyone else have to curb your enthusiasm for tote bag sewing? I love me a good tote bag pattern, but a gal can only use some many bags, right? I keep just a couple of favorite bags around, but when the free Costa Tote pattern showed up in my email from Helen’s Closet, I knew I had to make one soon.

I loved the cool denims that were used for the samples on the pattern, but I was having a hard time finding some and I wasn’t willing to spend much money to buy fancy denim. And that’s what spawned my recent bleach dying denim adventures! Kinda cool how projects roll into each other and new ideas are hatched when seeking creative sewing solutions.

I put two of those denim pieces to use to make a Costa Tote and I think I’m in love.

Costa Tote bag pattern from bleach dyed denim. || Pin Cut Sew Studio

This post contains affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

I know this bag is pretty simple, but there are elements that make it just perfect. I absolutely love the deep pockets on both sides and the slanted shape of the pocket top adds interest. It’s also reversible, so those pockets can be inside if you want.

Costa Tote Bag pattern with bleach dyed denim. || PIn Cut Sew Studio

I really like the deeper hems at the top and on the pocket piece, I think the top stitching there looks really nice. You can see that I used straps purchased by the yard from Hobby Lobby for this version. I also shortened the top by 2”, just due to personal preference. This was easy to do, since sewing the top seam is the final step, so you can try it on for size before deciding to shorten it or now.

One more thing to note, it’s a big bag, so it takes more fabric than you might imagine. Keep that in mind when shopping around!

All in all, this bag is PERFECTION. Grab the pattern from Helen’s closet and go make yourself one! I’ve taken it to the pool and the library more than once already and I can definitely see it going on trips with me in the future, plus being put to use for my homeschool co op, where I’ll be teaching drama and creative writing this year. I also think I’ll sew a few for Christmas gifts, I know the ladies in my family would love these. If I were going to purchase some denim to make another, it would definitely be this one!

Do you have a favorite bag pattern? Please share!

I tie-dyed denim with bleach and used it to make a Costa Tote bag! Come see the details :) || Pin Cut Sew Studio
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Back-To-School Sewing Projects (that aren't pencil pouches)

Even though we home school, I always think it’s fun to sew up a little something for my kids when we get started for the year. When I look up “back-to-school sewing”, though, most of the ideas are pencil pouches. Pencil pouches are great (see my pencil-shaped pencil pouch tutorial here), but I thought I’d round up the back-to-school sewing ideas that go beyond the zipper pouch. Enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

I always think it’s fun to sew up a little something for my kids when we get started with school for the year. When I look up “back-to-school sewing”, though, most of the ideas are pencil pouches. Pencil pouches are great, but I thought I’d round up the back-to-school sewing ideas that go beyond the zipper pouch. Enjoy! || PIn Cut Sew Studio

Back-to-School Sewing Ideas

Insulated Lunch Box by Mr. Domestic

Mr. Domestic has a free pattern for an insulated lunch box! He even has a video tutorial. Lunch boxes are a personal thing, in my experience. It has to be the right shape, keep your food cold, maybe a pocket for cutlery and napkins. And a handle is a must. This pattern seems to fit the bill for all those things! We have purchased lunch boxes in this shape for our homeschool co op, but they were cheaply made and I think we can do better. Glad to know there’s a pattern! When we pack lunches, we tend to use containers like these (or these glass ones if you’d prefer), and they fit well into this style of lunch box.

Water Bottle Holder by Fabric Art DIY

Water bottle holders are super handy, especially for littler students. It can be hard to remember to grab your water bottle when you go outside (or anywhere), so having this cute holder might motivate your kids (or you!) to bring your water along. For those older students, though, who may not think a cute water bottle holder is cool enough, check out these awesome paracord water bottle clips you can purchase on Etsy! They’re a best seller on Etsy, actually, and I can see why. I know my tweens and teen would be super into those.

Pretty Backpack by FastMade

I’m a big fan of backpacks and this one is so cool. I’m not sure this would work for a student with lots of heavy books, but this is the exact kind of bag I would have loved in college, when I wasn’t carrying any super heavy loads and wanted a more modern looking backpack than my Jansport (they were all the rage in the 90s, if anyone else remembers. Mine was almost this exact color, haha!) I know my girls would love the look of this bag too, for their co op classes.

Back to School Bundle, Backpack and Lunch Bag Pattern

Here’s another Etsy bestseller! This is a pattern for a more traditional backpack and lunch bag for your elementary aged children. The backpack comes in two sizes and the designer has really thought of everything, I can see why it’s such a popular pattern. It’s such a fun idea to add personalized patches to these kinds of items too. My daughter Layla would love a Gryffindor patch on hers!

Reusable Ziploc Bags by My Golden Thimble

This tutorial is pretty brilliant, since she shows you how to harvest a Ziploc bag for parts, using the zipper to make your own washable, reusable baggies. I made fabric baggies when my kids were little and we took snacks everywhere and they sure were handy and saved me a lot of money. I can imagine if your kids are in school and you’re packing lunches everyday, these bags would be a must-sew. If you’re not into making some, however, these look like a good bet too.

Composition Book Covers by Orange Bettie

I taught a couple classes of tween and teen girls to make composition book covers a couple years ago and they all loved this project! This tutorial takes composition book covers to the next level though, with a clear vinyl zipper pocket inside and a flap front. It helps that it uses one of my favorite sewing tools ever, the Babyville snaps and snap pliers! I don’t see any links to supplies on the tutorial page, so here is a link to the clear vinyl you’ll need and here are my favorite zippers for these kinds of projects (I always keep a stash of these zippers on hand!) She also mentions Wonder Clips, so you don’t have to poke holes in your vinyl with pins.

Period Bag for Teen Girls by Phat Quarters

I think we can all recall the anxiety over school and periods. This bag is such a great idea. It holds and hides all the necessities and is easy to sneak into the bathroom with no one knowing what’s inside. It will also help remind girls to stock it and be prepared! My girls may not go to regular school, but these are perfect to keep in their dance bags.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this round up of back-to-school sewing ideas! And if you can’t resist sewing just one more pencil pouch, here’s a link to my very own tutorial for the pencil-shaped pencil pouch. Super fun to make! And for your older students, here’s my basic zipper pouch tutorial.

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5 Things to Sew This Weekend

It’s that time again! Every couple of weeks, I compile the five best quick weekend sewing ideas I’ve saved over the last several days.

Let’s jump right in!

This post contains affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links.  For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Five things you can sew up in a weekend! | Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

Large Hot Pad

First up, I’ve been wanting to make a large, casserole-sized hot pad ever since my husband refinished our dining table and I’m afraid of putting heat on it. Deb’s Days has a great tutorial for one!

Pillow Case PJ

I love this idea! I immediately saved it to my “Sewing for Teens” board on Pinterest, because my girls would be so into making PJ shorts out of a vintage pillow case! Go grab the free pattern from The Sewing Revival.

String Bag

Carolyn Friedlander used her own gorgeous fabric line to make a stunning drawstring backpack with a front zipper. She used the String Bag pattern from Green Pepper Patterns. I think the zipper pocket really sets this apart from other similar bags.

Wide Legged Pants

So-Sew-Easy will walk you through how to sew a pair of wide leg pants using a pattern from Craftsy. This style is everywhere currently and they are super easy to sew!

Name Banner Bunting

In this tutorial, I walk you through how to make a name banner bunting for the little ones in your life. I’ve also made them for baby showers with the baby’s name on them, and I taught a class of kids how to make their own!

That’s five things! I hope you all have a great weekend and that you squeeze in some time for sewing!

Cheers :)

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What's the Deal with Cosplay!? (And How You Can Get Started)

It is no secret that costume sewing is my favorite thing ever. My kids and I start talking about Halloween costumes in June and I like to get started in August. But there’s this whole realm of costuming I’m sure you’ve heard of, that takes “costume” and turns it into something over and beyond your basic poster board and sweatpants DIY dress-up.

How to start with Cosplay sewing, even you’re a beginner at sewing! Tools, inspo, books, patterns, all in one place. | Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

Cosplay seems to have originated with the anime fan base, where people dressed up as their favorite anime characters, went to conventions that way and built community around this kind of costuming. Now Cosplay is defined more broadly as dressing up as a character from a book, movie, TV show or video game, or something inspired by any of those things. Often, cosplayers try to make a costume as historically accurately, or as “screen-accurately”, as possible.

Many of these costumes take hours on hours of work and are put on display at conventions! I don’t think I can fairly call myself a cosplayer, but it’s something I sooo wish I had time and money for (I almost titled this post, “If I were a Cosplayer”), and I sure do love to follow some cosplayers on the Internet! My absolute favorites to follow on Instagram are Hoppin’ Bobbin, who is currently finishing up an Edwardian inspired Ariel costume (using couture techniques, absolutely stunning!) and the husband/wife duo Michaelrburson and HobbitParty. These two have made James & Lilly Potter, Mary Poppins, Doctor Strange, and Luna Lovegood, among other characters. They also have a brand new podcast called Hold My Butterbeer (so clever).

The coolest thing about cosplay is that it’s brought a whole new generation of people into the art of sewing! Many, many cosplayers say they started sewing in order to make costumes for Comic Cons and other such events. Most of them just get started, learning as they go and improving with every costume. They even delve into pattern making skills, which is something most modern sewists are still afraid of! I find it so cool and impressive that so many are jumping into sewing with both feet and conquering difficult skills to make the costumes they want.

All that to say, if you want to start sewing cosplay, but you aren’t sure how or where to start, I have resources for you!

How to Get Started with Cosplay

Pick a Project

The best way to get started is to choose a project and jump in. Collect photos of the costume or start an inspiration board. Start looking for the right fabrics in the right colors. If you’re a beginner, accept that your first costumes won’t be perfect, but you’ll build skills along the way. On the other hand, be realistic. Maybe don’t start with the most elaborate costume on your wish list. Consider your budget in relation to the cost of materials and consider your free time in relation to how many hours a costume might take. We’re thinking about Halloween costumes right now and my daughter wants to be some manifestation of Eliza Doolittle from the Audrey Hepburn movie, My Fair Lady. At first she wanted this pink dress, but I know I don’t have the kind of spare time it would take to make that dress and I’m not sure I’d be willing to spend the money for the right fabric. It sure would stretch my skills, though, and I think that’s the appeal for many people who sew cosplay! This one, on the other hand, is totally doable! I already rounded up some patterns that can be adapted to work and I found a fabric for only $3.99 a yard!

Remember, always make a muslin before cutting into your good fabric!

Audrey Hepburn as Eliza Doolittle costume plans and inspiration. | PIn, Cut, Sew STudio.com

Patterns for Cosplay

First, if you’re not ready to start drafting your own patterns, check out McCall’s Cosplay line of patterns. They’ve done in incredible job of keeping up with the times here! You can find patterns for full costumes, or for cloaks, hats, and other accessories. If you’re new to reading patterns, check out my series on how to read a sewing pattern. I’ve used tons of commercial costume patterns with good success, (see my daughter as Hermione Grainger below, made with Simplicity 8723) so just hop on the Simplicity or McCall’s sites and start browsing. If historical costumes are what you’re interested in (did you know there’s a Jane Austen convention every Summer???), a few pattern companies to try are Reconstructing HIstory and Patterns of Time (they also have a sister site, Cosplay Much, where you can buy the harder to make accessories. These are just a few, but a quick google search brings up plenty more. Like I mentioned above, shop for patterns with an open mind. I plan to use this one for Eliza’s jacket and this one for her skirt. These patterns do not have Eliza vibes in the photos as all, but the lines are just what I need. It helps to notice the line drawings, rather than just look at the photos on the envelopes.

Harry Potter Hermione Grainger costume using Simplicity 8723 | PIn, Cut, Sew Studio.com

Cosplay Books

There are SO MANY how-to books on Cosplay available. This one on armor and props gets great reviews. The Make: series is always a good bet, so this one on creating sci-fi armor, weapons and props is sure to be good too. There’s also The Cosplay Handbook and How to Forge Foam Weapons. I believe Hoppin’ Bobbin swears by this Couture Book for advanced techniques. I have that book on my wish list!

Helpful Cosplay Tools: Some necessary and some that would just be cool to have

Obviously a basic sewing machine is a must, but a serger is so helpful when sewing fabrics that fray, which many costume fabrics do. You can of course finish seams in other ways, but a serger will make your life easier!

Hobbit Party uses a 3D printer pretty often to create little accessories that are hard to find, but are essential to a character. I don’t own one, but I can see that if I were to cosplay often, it would save a lot of money in the long run. And it’s definitely better than paper mache’. Haha.

A Cricut is another thing on my wishlist! I’m thinking of spending my birthday and Christmas money on one because my girls and I keep thinking of ways to use it! For cosplay, a Cricut can create logos, appliques, all kinds of things.

Rit Dyes are something you’ll become friends with if you need to get a fabric to just the right color. Remember, there’s dyes for cottons and natural fibers, then there are other dyes for sythetics.

Have Fun!

In my current phase of life, I don’t make time to sew costumes for myself, but in the future, my husband pinky swore we could become Comic Con people and dress up as Dumbledore and Professor McGonagall, ha! We’ll see if he feels the same way in 20 years. For now, I’ll keep making fun costumes for my kids!

Get started sewing DIY costumes! | Pin, Cut, Sew Studio
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Scrap Busting for Garment Fabrics

If you were to type “scrap busting ideas” into Google or Pinterest, you’d likely get plenty of great ideas for quilting fabrics and cottons. But what are you supposed to do with those leftover bits of rayons, linens and knits? If you do a lot of garment sewing, you may find those scraps harder to find uses for, but I have a list of good ideas for you today and they’re all about stash busting those fashion fabric scraps!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

How to use up clothing fabric scraps in lots of different ways! || Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

Scrap busting ideas for clothing fabrics:

Search for patterns that use very little fabric.

Pajama shorts are a great way to use up scraps. I made a pair of PJ shorts for Natalie with only about half a yard to work with. I used the Lexi Chick Boxers pattern (adding a waistband per her preference). I’ve made myself several pair of pajama shorts using this pattern because it’s so great for scraps! Large enough scraps can also be turned into camisoles or tank tops. This easy rectangle top is a great option if your scrap is around a yard. Alternatively, those scraps that aren’t quite big enough to make yourself something out of may be just large enough to sew something for the kids in your life. I sewed my daughter a bunch of Jalie tanks out of leftover knits one year when she was younger and they really filled a gap in her Summer wardrobe that year.

Sew Pajama Shorts with leftover fabrics!

Sew Undergarments

Scraps are so perfect for sewing bras and underwear. I’ve made lounge bras with this pattern out of all kinds of knit scraps, even a piece of soft stretch lace. For truly beautiful underwear patterns, check out Evie La Luve she has such gorgeous designs and most require very little fabric. If you’ve never sewn delicates before, those silky or knit scraps offer a great opportunity to try something new!

Use scraps for linings or facings, or other small bits

I love to add a contrasting facing or binding to my handmade garments. There have been times when I haven’t had quite enough fabric to cut certain pieces and have had to sub in some scraps. That was the case with the cami pictured below and the contrasting binding and straps ended up being what I love most about this little top! Other uses for your scraps are pocket bags, Hong Kong seam finishes, cuffs, neckbands, waistband or neckband facings, patch pockets, casings, tie belts, lining pieces, straps, button plackets, hem bands or embellishments such as ruffles or bias strips.

Ideas for using up those clothing fabrics scraps! || PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

Plan garments with mixed fabrics.

I once made a raglan woven top pattern using a lace for the sleeves and a solid rayon for the front and back pieces. It was so much prettier than it would have been with just the solid! Raglan sleeves are the perfect opportunity to use two different fabrics. Using contrasting panels in a dress with interesting lines is another option. Often, running short of fabric forces some creative thinking, so those scraps might come in handy!

Use scraps for bags and other small projects.

We tend to gravitate toward cottons for most small sewing projects like bags, wallets, or sleep masks, but your garment fabric scraps can add so much interest and texture to these ideas! Silky sleep masks, rayon bag linings, denim wallets, linen clutch purses, the possibilities are endless if you think outside the box. Those knit scraps are perfect for a batch of baby hats!

Use garment scraps for quilting fabrics!

I made a baby quilt to gift a friend several months ago and included some garment scraps mixed in with my cute cottons. Can you spot both the fabric from the shorts and the fabric from the camisole binding?? The results were beautiful, the shirtings, cotton voiles, and linens added so much texture and made for a more modern finished product!

Quilting with unexpected fabrics! || PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

I hope I’ve given you some ideas to use up those fashion fabric scraps! If you have any ideas to add, I’d love to hear them :)

Cheers!




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How Inspecting Store Bought Garments Can Improve Your Sewing Technique

I’ve been experimenting with some pattern mashing lately and so far most things have turned out pretty great! One example is this favorite garment and this dress I’m sharing today is another. I learned a few things from this project and I’m happy to share my light bulb moments with you!

I was really wanting a casual and easy summer dress. I’m set for church dresses, but more easy weekday dresses would fill a gap for me. I scored the rest of some beautiful brushed poly knit fabric at Hobby Lobby. It was being clearanced out so I got it super cheap and bought all that was left.

I thumbed through my pattern stash and couldn’t find any knit dress patterns that sung to me for this project, BUT, I did have a Burda knit top pattern I’d made before and like and thought I could hack it into a dress. Thankfully, it worked!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

I made a mash up a Burda top pattern and an Old Navy dress and learned some new techniques along the way! Come see how inspecting your rtw clothes can improve your sewing skills. || Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

A few notes on how I accomplished this mash-up. I have an Old Navy knit dress that I really like the fit of, so I measured the length of that bodice, using the measurement to fold my pattern pieces up to reflect that bodice length. I sewed the bodice as instructed, I only made a minor change in the neckline finish.

For the skirt, I used that Old Navy dress to draft the skirt by tracing it directly onto my fabric, pulling the waistline taught to get the correct measurement. (This is my favorite tracing tool of all time). I cut two, so the front and back skirt are the same. To my surprise, the skirt is more like a quarter circle skirt, not a gathered rectangle like I’d assumed and probably would have cut if I hadn’t bothered inspecting my Old Navy dress. I don’t think I would have been as happy with that result, so the lesson here is to inspect well-fitting RTW clothing more often!

The Old Navy dress also had an interesting technique for the waistline elastic that I copied and loved. Usually patterns for knits with elasticized waists will have you make a casing out of the seam allowance and draw the elastic through, but I always find that bulky and shifty. Other patterns will have you zig zag the elastic to the seam after it’s sewn, but I find the elastic stretches out too much and I often end up unpicking it to shorten the elastic and resewing. My Old Navy dress, however, had that elastic serged right into the seam. So once I’d pinned my skirt to my bodice, I cut elastic about 85% of the seam’s circumference (I used 1/4” braided). I marked it in quarters, pinned it to the waistline at those marks and serged the whole seam in one go. It worked awesome, I will always use that method from now on!

Burda 6428 meets Old Navy. Come see how I mashed a top pattern with an Old Navy dress and what I learned along the way! || PIn, Cut, Sew Studio

While we’re on the subject of serging, I cannot recommend my Juki serger enough. I’ve had it for over 6 years and it’s been a dream the entire time. I’ve never once needed to get it serviced! If you’re on the fence about getting a serger, take the leap, you will not regret it. And if they fancy ones are out of your budget, give Juki a try, it’s very budget friendly.

I’m sure I’m not the only sewist who takes a careful look at their own clothes or clothing at stores to see how they’re made. I scored an Athleta linen moto jacket at the thrift store a few weeks ago and I was wearing it at church and caught myself marveling over how they finished the cuff plackets on the sleeves, ha! (It had godets! So interesting!) Do you have stories of things you’ve learned from store bought items? Have you ever taken photos of clothes at the store to copy them at home? (guilty). Tell me about it in the comments :)

Cheers!

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Five Things to Sew This Weekend

I keep an editorial calendar of posts I plan to write and I when I checked it see what today’s post would be, I got excited! I love writing these Five Things to Sew posts! I keep a collection on Blog Lovin’ called “Sewspiration” and many of those things end up here in these posts, as well as new sewing tutorials I’ve spotted on Pinterest and around the web. The only hard part is picking my five favorites!

I’ve narrowed it down to just five things you can sew up this weekend. Let’s get started!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

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The Costa Tote by Helen’s Closet

First up, Helen’s Closet revealed a free new tote bag pattern this week and I am dying. I love a good tote bag, but there’s something about this asymmetrical pocket that sings to me. AND it’s reversible!? I’m thinking of all kinds of family members who would love a version of this for Christmas. If you hop over to grab it, be sure and check out her other patterns. I’m the Blackwood Cardigan’s #1 fan.

Magnetic Bookmark and Pen Holder

This is a great little idea and tutorial by Lorelei Jayne that I know my girls would love. In fact, I’m teaching a creative writing class at our homeschool co op this year and all my students happen to be Middle School girls! I’d love to make them each one as a gift.

DIY Leather Belt Bag

Are fanny packs back?? I’m not sure about those 80’s kind, but I do know this belt bag by Closet Case Patterns is something I can get behind! I’ve also been wanting to try more sewing on leather, so this would be a great project to start with!

Folding Magazine Rack

I’m an avid reader AND and homeschool mom and I have a vintage folding magazine rack that I use constantly. I’ve often thought I could use another. This is a very simple wood and fabric tutorial by Man Made that I’m going to try! I bet my husband already has the wood pieces I’ll need and the sewing part is very simple.

Easy Rectangle Top

If you missed it last week, this is my own tutorial for a very simple top based off of Mexican embroidered top I thrifted and fell in love with. It is seriously the easiest top you’ll ever make and the possibilities for embellishment are plentiful! The best part is, you only need a yard of fabric. If you make one, I’d love to see your version!

I hope you have some time to sew this weekend! We have a new couch coming and a baby shower to go to, but I’m still putting some sewing on my to-do list. I tend to post about the things I’m sewing in my Instagram Stories, so you can follow along there if you want. And if you enjoyed this post, check out Five Things to Sew: Travel Edition!

Hel

lo, World!

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Dancewear Patterns: They DO Exist!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that while I am not paid to promote certain items, I will earn a small commission should you purchase items through these links, at no additional cost to you. For more info, see my disclosure policy.

It’s no secret around here that I’ve accomplished a huge goal recently of learning to sew activewear, and more specifically dancewear! Both my tween/teen daughters are ballerinas and let me tell you, dance leotards are not cheap! They tend to run at least $60 per leotard and they each need two or three at a time, since they both dance four days a week. To have their black leotards in pretty designs is preferred, of course, but the price goes up with every cute detail, it seems!

The dancewear patterns may seem hard to find at first, but there are more out there than you might think! So I’m here to complie a list today of dancewear patterns. If you’re still new at sewing, don’t let this intimidate you like I did for so many years! You can sew activewear with the most basic sewing equipment, you don’t even need a serger and it’s a great way to build skills. So if you have a dancer in your life, no matter how long you’ve been sewing, this post is for you!

You can sew dancewear! Click over to see my big roundup of sewing patterns for leotards, skirts, leggings and even Irish dancing and character skirts. || Pin, Cut, Sew Studio

Before we start, know that this list is of in-print patterns only. Though I’m sure there’re tons of out-of-print dancewear patterns, both our selection of sewing notions and our access to professional techniques for unique genres of sewing has come a long way in the last decade, so I can’t vouch for those oldest patterns as far as the techniques and finishes they may recommend. So, without further ado,

The Big List of Dancewear Sewing Patterns.

Jalie.

This will be no surprise to you at all. Jalie runs the market